6. Uri Fidelman, Feynman's Temporal Directions and the Emission of Light by Gases: Reconsideration of the Problem of Nonlocality

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Volume 19: Pages 517-533, 2006

Feynman's Temporal Directions and the Emission of Light by Gases: Reconsideration of the Problem of Nonlocality

Uri Fidelman 1

1Department of Humanities and Arts, Department of Education in Technology and Science, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 Israel

Feynman hypothesized that antiparticles may be considered to be particles that travel backward in time. Two conclusions are logically implied from this hypothesis. The first conclusion is that time is not onedimensional, but it has at least two independent perpendicular axes. This conclusion explains the difficulties in obtaining a united field theory and removes the contradiction between the theories of relativity and quantum mechanics. The second conclusion is that each particle and gaseous molecule is a superposition of matter and antimatter. Therefore there is some small amplitude at which colliding gaseous molecules may annihilate each other and emit γray photons. The theory is developed further to explain the relation between time, energy, and mass by Feynman's diagrams. Another development is a new approach to the problem of nonlocality and to the collapse of the wavefunction.

Keywords: electrostatic force, electron, positron, direction of particles in time, 3 + 3 spacetime, united field theory, quantum entanglement, antimatter, collapse of the wavefunction, sonoluminescence, nonlocality

Received: December 17, 2004; Published Online: December 15, 2008